First of all, let me apologize to all of you who wrote to us wondering what happened to our blogging activity. We are back and appreciate you following us as we commit to blogging more actively!
Now onto a new topic that caught my eye and compelled me to write about it! I came across an article addressing recruiters and hiring managers with tips on interviewing culturally diverse candidates (http://hiring.monster.ca/hr/hr-best-practices/recruiting-hiring-advice/screening-job-candidates/interviewing-culturally-diverse-candidates-canada.aspx ).
The article suggests that ever so often hiring managers miss out on great candidates by misunderstanding their cultural differences. A candidate avoids looking you in the eye, has a hard time cracking a smile or otherwise emoting, smells funky and stands too close to you? No problem, says Monster.ca. Give them a chance! They might be German, Indian, Brazilian, Chinese, or any other nationality, and what seems odd to you is perfectly common in their home country.
Well, let`s get real for a second. We are not in these candidates` home country. In a perfect world, we would all take the time to learn and appreciate one another`s backgrounds, peculiarities and odd quirks. We would hold hands and be one happy family. In the real world, however, we do not have such time and do need to think of an effect a new hire has on the existing workforce.  I firmly believe that it is the candidate`s responsibility to get acquainted with the local customs and understand what is expected in an interview or a job setting. As a hiring manager, how can I be sure that a candidate who did not take the time to do his or her homework will do so once hired?
The web-site`s advice is to coach new employees in order to help them fit in. Well, who is to say that: a) they will be thrilled to take the advice on board and b) they will not call Commission des Normes du Travail to file a discrimination complaint?  
Look, I do understand the multicultural nature of the local workforce and I truly believe that we are richer for it. I also think that the ever growing political correctness is charming and endearing, but only to an extent. Do you know the saying: “When in Rome, do as the Romans”? Well, that is something I can agree with.
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